Singapore as an impregnable fortress

Singapore before the Japanese Occupation

Before the Japanese Occupation, Singapore was an impregnable fortress. Singapore was also referred to as The Gibralta of the East, due to its good defences. The British had a lot of big guns and concrete beach defenses.Singapore was also protected by over 20 big canons that can shoot as far as 42km. Other than that, they also had 2 battle cruises that were thought to be undefeated. The British also had 137000 soldiers from many countries. With this, the British called Singapore an impregnable fortress.

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A tank in Singapore.
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A group of soldiers marching

 

During the Japanese Occupation

Singapore lacked air defenses and those available were placed at the wrong positions. Bad decisions were also made by British commanders. The commanders sent most of the forces to the coastal area that the Japanese faked attacks on, which made the forces at the bridge insufficient and was taken down really quickly.The Japanese took over many brigades and key positions in Singapore, like the airstrip and strongholds and reservoirs..This caused the British to be overwhelmed quickly and caused major panics in Singapore and the British troops to be cornered from multiple positions, which allowed tanks to land on the coastal area unopposed which made the situation more dire for the British.

After the Japanese Occupation

The main downfall of Singapore was because of bad positioning of weapons by British.  The main reason why people thought Singapore was an impregnable fortress was because of the sheer amount of firepower. The British troops also outnumbered the Japanese by 140000 troops ready to fight at any time given.

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A destroyed tank after the war

 

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A ship burned by the Japanese at Pearl Harbour. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Members: Sabrina, Nurin, Ivan, Justin, Jue Cheng

Credit: Google images

 

 

 

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